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Difference between revisions of "Ήλύσιον"

Φοβοῦ τὸ γῆρας, οὐ γὰρ ἔρχεται μόνον -> Fear old age, for it never comes alone
Menander
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{{etym
 
{{etym
|etymtx=Grammatical information: adj.<br />Meaning: adjunct of [[πεδίον]] (δ 563, A. R. 4, 811, Str., Plu.), also without main substantive (IG 14, 1750); rarely <b class="b3">Ήλύσιος λειμών</b>, [[χῶρος]] (Luc., late inscr.) Abode of the Blessed after death.<br />Derivatives: [[Ήλύσιος]] [[Elysian]] ([[αὖραι]] etc., IG 14, 1389). Here also <b class="b3">ἐν-ηλύσιος ἐμβρόντητος</b>, [[κεραυνόβλητος]] H., [[ἐνηλύσια]] (A. Fr. 17) <b class="b3">τὰ κατασκηφθέντα χωρία</b> H.? taken as "being in Elysion", as those hit by lightning acc. to folk belief would come in a higher form of life (thus Cocco, s. below). In the same meaning also the simplex [[ἠλύσια]] n. pl. (Polem. Hist. 93).<br />Origin: PG [a word of Pre-Greek origin]<br />Etymology: Unexplained, without a doubt Pre-Greek (e. g. Malten ArchJb. 28, 35ff.; on Elysion as Pre-Greek conception Nilsson Gr. Rel. 1, 324ff.). Often connected with [[ἐλεύσομαι]], [[ἤλυθον]] (EM 428, 36, Fick 13, 200, Capelle Arch. f. Religionswiss. 26, 30ff.); against this view a. o. Wackernagel Dehnungsgesetz 5 (= Kl. Schr. 2, 901), Güntert Kalypso 38 n. 3. Untenable IE etymologies also by Schrader Sprachvergleichung und Urgesch.3 435 (to Lith. <b class="b2">vė̃lės</b> <b class="b2">ghosts of the dead</b>, OWNo.[[valr]] m. sg. <b class="b2">the corpses on the battlefield</b> etc.; against these views Güntert l. c.), by Carnoy Beitr. z. Namenforschung 7, 119 (to <b class="b3">ἦλος τόπος</b>..., <b class="b3">ἐν ᾦ οὑδεν φύεται</b> H.). Explanations from Semitic (Lewy Fremdw. 219ff., Cocco Biblos 31, separ. ed. 1ff.) are also to be considered wrong. Beekes, FS Watkins 1998, 19-23, refutes that somebody struck by lightning goes to Elysion; against Burkert, Glotta 39 (1961) 208 -213. He thinks the word is derived with <b class="b3">-ιο-</b> from a geographical name * <b class="b3">᾽Ε</b>\/ <b class="b3">᾽Αλυτ</b>\/<b class="b3">θ-</b>, with long first vowel, perhaps metri causa.
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|etymtx=Grammatical information: adj.<br />Meaning: adjunct of [[πεδίον]] (δ 563, A. R. 4, 811, Str., Plu.), also without main substantive (IG 14, 1750); rarely <b class="b3">Ήλύσιος λειμών</b>, [[χῶρος]] (Luc., late inscr.) Abode of the Blessed after death.<br />Derivatives: [[Ήλύσιος]] [[Elysian]] ([[αὖραι]] etc., IG 14, 1389). Here also <b class="b3">ἐν-ηλύσιος ἐμβρόντητος</b>, [[κεραυνόβλητος]] H., [[ἐνηλύσια]] (A. Fr. 17) <b class="b3">τὰ κατασκηφθέντα χωρία</b> H.? taken as "being in Elysion", as those hit by lightning acc. to folk belief would come in a higher form of life (thus Cocco, s. below). In the same meaning also the simplex [[ἠλύσια]] n. pl. (Polem. Hist. 93).<br />Origin: PG [a word of Pre-Greek origin]<br />Etymology: Unexplained, without a doubt Pre-Greek (e. g. Malten ArchJb. 28, 35ff.; on Elysion as Pre-Greek conception Nilsson Gr. Rel. 1, 324ff.). Often connected with [[ἐλεύσομαι]], [[ἤλυθον]] (EM 428, 36, Fick 13, 200, Capelle Arch. f. Religionswiss. 26, 30ff.); against this view a. o. Wackernagel Dehnungsgesetz 5 (= Kl. Schr. 2, 901), Güntert Kalypso 38 n. 3. Untenable IE etymologies also by Schrader Sprachvergleichung und Urgesch.3 435 (to Lith. <b class="b2">vė̃lės</b> <b class="b2">ghosts of the dead</b>, OWNo.[[valr]] m. sg. <b class="b2">the corpses on the battlefield</b> etc.; against these views Güntert l. c.), by Carnoy Beitr. z. Namenforschung 7, 119 (to <b class="b3">ἦλος τόπος</b>..., <b class="b3">ἐν ᾦ οὑδεν φύεται</b> H.). Explanations from Semitic (Lewy Fremdw. 219ff., Cocco Biblos 31, separ. ed. 1ff.) are also to be considered wrong. Beekes, FS Watkins 1998, 19-23, refutes that somebody struck by lightning goes to Elysion; against Burkert, Glotta 39 (1961) 208 -213. He thinks the word is derived with <b class="b3">-ιο-</b> from a geographical name * <b class="b3">᾽Ε</b>\/ <b class="b3">Ἀλυτ</b>\/<b class="b3">θ-</b>, with long first vowel, perhaps metri causa.
 
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Latest revision as of 06:34, 30 July 2020

Frisk Etymological English

Grammatical information: adj.
Meaning: adjunct of πεδίον (δ 563, A. R. 4, 811, Str., Plu.), also without main substantive (IG 14, 1750); rarely Ήλύσιος λειμών, χῶρος (Luc., late inscr.) Abode of the Blessed after death.
Derivatives: Ήλύσιος Elysian (αὖραι etc., IG 14, 1389). Here also ἐν-ηλύσιος ἐμβρόντητος, κεραυνόβλητος H., ἐνηλύσια (A. Fr. 17) τὰ κατασκηφθέντα χωρία H.? taken as "being in Elysion", as those hit by lightning acc. to folk belief would come in a higher form of life (thus Cocco, s. below). In the same meaning also the simplex ἠλύσια n. pl. (Polem. Hist. 93).
Origin: PG [a word of Pre-Greek origin]
Etymology: Unexplained, without a doubt Pre-Greek (e. g. Malten ArchJb. 28, 35ff.; on Elysion as Pre-Greek conception Nilsson Gr. Rel. 1, 324ff.). Often connected with ἐλεύσομαι, ἤλυθον (EM 428, 36, Fick 13, 200, Capelle Arch. f. Religionswiss. 26, 30ff.); against this view a. o. Wackernagel Dehnungsgesetz 5 (= Kl. Schr. 2, 901), Güntert Kalypso 38 n. 3. Untenable IE etymologies also by Schrader Sprachvergleichung und Urgesch.3 435 (to Lith. vė̃lės ghosts of the dead, OWNo.valr m. sg. the corpses on the battlefield etc.; against these views Güntert l. c.), by Carnoy Beitr. z. Namenforschung 7, 119 (to ἦλος τόπος..., ἐν ᾦ οὑδεν φύεται H.). Explanations from Semitic (Lewy Fremdw. 219ff., Cocco Biblos 31, separ. ed. 1ff.) are also to be considered wrong. Beekes, FS Watkins 1998, 19-23, refutes that somebody struck by lightning goes to Elysion; against Burkert, Glotta 39 (1961) 208 -213. He thinks the word is derived with -ιο- from a geographical name * ᾽Ε\/ Ἀλυτ\/θ-, with long first vowel, perhaps metri causa.