Ask at the forum if you have an Ancient or Modern Greek query!

morum

Φιλοκαλοῦμέν τε γὰρ μετ' εὐτελείας καὶ φιλοσοφοῦμεν ἄνευ μαλακίας -> Our love of what is beautiful does not lead to extravagance; our love of the things of the mind does not makes us soft.
Τhucydides, 2.40.1

Latin > English (Lewis & Short)

mōrum: i, n., = μῶρον and μόρον,
I a mulberry; a blackberry: nigra mora, Hor. S. 2, 4, 22; cf. Plin. 15, 24, 27, § 96: in duris haerentia mora rubetis, Ov. M. 1, 105; cf. Plin. 24, 13, 73, § 117.

Latin > French (Gaffiot)

mōrum,¹⁴ ī, n. (μόρον), mûre, fruit du mûrier : Virg. B. 6, 22 ; Plin. 15, 96 || mûre sauvage : Ov. M. 1, 105.

Latin > German (Georges)

mōrum, ī, n. (μῶρον u. μόρον), I) die Maulbeere, Plin. 15, 96 sq. Verg. ecl. 6, 22. Hor. sat. 2, 4, 22. Ov. met. 4, 127. Edict. Diocl. 6, 77. – II) die Brombeere, Plin. 24, 117. Ov. met. 1, 105.

Latin > English

morum mori N N :: mulberry; fruit of the black mulberry