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Ilium

Ἓν οἶδα, ὅτι οὐδὲν οἶδα –> I know only one thing, that I know nothing | all I know is that I know nothing.
Diogenes Laertius, Lives of the Philosophers, Book 2 sec. 32.

English > Greek (Woodhouse)

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Ἴλιον, τό; see Troy.

Latin > English (Lewis & Short)

Īlĭum: or Īlĭon, ĭi, n., = Ἴλιον,
I a poetical name for Troja, the city of Ilium, Troy, Verg. A. 1, 68; 5, 261; Hor. C. 1, 15, 33; Ov. M. 6, 95; 13, 408; Cic. Div. 1, 14, 24 et saep.—Called also Īlĭos, i, f., acc. to the Gr. Ἴλιος, Hor. C. 4, 9, 18; id. Epod. 14, 14; Ov. A. A. 1, 363; id. M. 14, 467.—Also a later Ilium, built upon the coast, Liv. 35, 43, 3; 37, 9, 7.—
II Derivv.
   A Īlĭus, a, um, adj., of or belonging to Ilium, Ilian, Trojan: tellus, Verg. A. 9, 285: res, id. ib. 1, 268: matres, Hor. Epod. 17, 11: turmae, id. Carm. Sec. 37.—Subst.: Īlĭi, ōrum, m., the Trojans, Plaut. Bacch. 4, 9, 27.—
   B Īlĭăcus, a, um, adj., the same: orae, Verg. A. 2, 117: classis, id. ib. 5, 607: fata, id. ib. 3, 182: Penates, id. ib. 3, 603: cineres, id. ib. 2, 431: amores, i. e. Paris, Mart. 12, 52, 9: hospes Didus, i. e. Æneas, Sil. 8, 50: Vesta, worshipped at Troy, Ov. F. 6, 227; hence, Alba, where also Vesta was worshipped, Luc. 5, 400: carmen, i. e. Homer's Iliad, Hor. A. P. 129; cf.: Macer, a poet who wrote on the Trojan war, Ov. P. 4, 16, 6: dextra, i. e. Ganymede's, Stat. S. 4, 2, 11: mons, i. e. Phrygian marble, id. ib. 27: Iliacoque jugum memorabile remo, i. e. the promontory of Misenum, where Misenus, a follower of Æneas, was drowned, id. ib. 3, 5, 98: muri, i. e. of Rome, as founded by descendants of the Trojan Æneas, Sil. 10, 387; hence, also, cuspis, of the consul Flaminius, id. 5, 595.—Prov.: Iliacos intra muros peccatur et extra, Hor. Ep. 1, 2, 16.—
   C Īlĭenses, ium, m., inhabitants of Ilium, Ilians, Suet. Tib. 52; id. Claud. 25; id. Ner. 7.—
   D Īlĭădes, ae, m., the Trojan, i. e. Ganymede, Ov. M. 10, 160.—
   E Īlĭas, ădis, f.
   1    The Trojan woman, i. e. Helen, Ov. Tr. 2, 371.—In plur.: Īlĭădes, um, Trojan women or girls, Verg. A. 3, 65; 2, 580.—
   2    The celebrated epic poem that describes the Trojan war, the Iliad, Prop. 2, 34 (3, 32), 66; Ov. A. A. 3, 414. —On account of its great extent, used fig. to represent a great quantity or number, an Iliad, a whole Iliad, Ov. P. 2, 7, 33; cf. written as Greek: tanta malorum impendet Ἰλιάς, Cic. Att. 8, 11, 3; and in plur.: tunc vero longas condimus Iliadas, Prop. 2, 1, 14.

Latin > French (Gaffiot)

(2) Ilĭum¹⁰ (-ŏn), ĭī, n., Ilĭos, ĭī, f., Ilion ou Troie : Cic. Div. 1, 24 ; Virg. En. 1, 68 ; Ov. M. 1, 95 || Hor. O. 4, 9, 18 ; Ov. M. 14, 467 || Ilĭus, a, um, d’Ilion : Virg. En. 9, 285.

Latin > German (Georges)

(1) Īlium1, s. Ilion.