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bibliotheca

Ἦθος ἀνθρώπῳ δαίμων -> A man's character is his fate
Heraclitus, fr. B 119 Diels

Latin > English (Lewis & Short)

biblĭŏthēca: (also bī̆blĭŏthēcē, Cic. Fam. 13, 77, 3; Inscr. Grut. 584;
I and BYBL-, Inscr. Orell. 40; 41; 1172), ae, f., = βιβλιοθήκη, a library; and, as in Greek and English, both a library-room and a collection of books, Fest. p. 28. The expl. of Isidorus applies to the first signif.: bibliotheca est locus, ubi reponuntur libri, βίβλος enim Graece liber, θήκη repositorium dicitur, Isid. Orig. 15, 5, 5; cf. id. ib. 18, 9, 3; 6, 3, 1. The first public library at Rome was collected by Asinius Pollio A.U.C. 715, B.C. 39, in the atrium of the Temple of Liberty, Plin. 7, 30, 31, § 115; 35, 2, 2, § 10; Isid. Orig. 6, 5, 2; Ov. Tr. 3, 1, 71; Quint. 11, 3, 4. Augustus founded two others, the Octavian, named after his sister Octavia, A.U.C. 721, B.C. 33, near the Theatre of Marcellus, Plut. Vit. Marcell.; Ov. Tr. 3, 1, 60 and 69 Jahn; and five years after, the Palatine (Gr. and Lat.) Library, on the Palatine Hill, in the Temple of Apollo, Hor. Ep. 1, 3, 17; Suet. Aug. 29; Dio, 53, 1; Inscr. Orell. 40 and 41. Besides these there were other considerable libraries in Rome, e. g. in the Temple of Peace, Gell. 16, 8, 2; in the house of Tiberius, id. 13, 19; but esp. one founded by Trajan, id. 11, 17, and united by Diocletian with his Thermis, Vop. Prob. 2. Individuals also possessed large libraries, Cic. Fam. 7, 28, 2; id. Q. Fr. 3, 4, 5; id. Att. 4, 10, 1; id. Div. 2, 3, 8; id. de Or. 1, 44, 195; Quint. 10, 1, 104; 10, 1, 57; Plut. Lucull.; Hor. C. 1, 29, 13; Sen. Tranq. 9; Suet. Aug. 56; esp. at their country-seats, Cic. Fin. 3, 2, 7; Mart. 7, 17; Plin. Ep. 3, 7, 8 al.—The books were arranged in cases or on shelves along the walls (armaria, foruli, loculamenta, capsae).—The librarian, or person who had the charge of the books, was called a bibliothecā, Inscr. Orell. 40 and 41, or bibliothecarius, v. Dict. of Antiq.

Latin > French (Gaffiot)

biblĭŏthēca,¹² æ, f. (βιβλιοθήκη), bibliothèque [salle] : Cic. Fam. 7, 28, 2 ; Quint. 10, 1, 104 || [meuble] : Plin. Min. Ep. 2, 17, 8.
     acc. bibliothecen Cic. Fam. 13, 77, 3.

Latin > German (Georges)

bibliothēca, ae, f., (βιβλιοθήκη) die Bibliothek, I) als Ort: a) = Büchergestell, Bücherschrank, Repositorium, bibliothecae parietibus inhaerentes, ICt.: parieti cubiculi in bibliothecae speciem armarium insertum est, quod non legendos libros, sed lectitandos capit, Plin. ep. – b) = Büchersaal, abdo me in bibliothecam, Cic.: in bibliotheca, quae in Lycio est, assedimus, Cic.: M. Catonem vidi in bibliotheca sedentem, Cic. – II) als Büchersammlung: bibl. Apollinis, Fronto: bibl. Ulpia, Vopisc.: promere e bibliotheca Aristotelis librum, Gell.: bibliothecam comparare ac digerere, Suet.: bibliothecas Graecas Latinasque publicare, Suet.: bibliothecam ad communem delectationem instituere, Vitr.: bibliothecas habere, unam Graecam, alteram Latinam, Petr.: e bibliotheca Luculli quibusdam libris uti, Cic.: bibliothecā alcis pasci, Cic.: bibliothecam suam Graecam supplere, Cic.: bibliothecam ordinare, Suet.: bibliothecen alcis multorum nummorum tractare (v. einem Sklaven), Cic.: bibliothecae codices componere, ICt.: alqm supra bibliothecam constituere, Vitr.: supra bibliothecam esse, Vitr.: bibliothecae Palatinae praeesse, Suet.: a bibliotheca, Bibliothekar, Inscr. – Über die Bibliotheken der Alten übh. s. Beckers Gallus 2. S. 363 ff. (Ausg. 3); über die Bibliotheken Roms L. Preller Die Regionen der Stadt Rom 219 ff. – /griech. Nbf. bibliothece, wov. Akk. bibliothecen, Cic. ep. 13, 77, 3. – Schreibung bybliotheca bei Tac. dial. 21 u. 37 Halm. Apul. apol. 55 u. flor. 18 u. 19. Amm. 14, 6, 18 u. 22, 16, 13 G. Corp. inscr. Lat. 3, 607.

Latin > English

bibliotheca bibliothecae N F :: library (either collection of books or the building, also person in charge)